Relieve Anxiety by Fleeing into a Purpose — Season 1, Episode 11 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

As a human being, you need a compelling purpose. Otherwise you are prone to anxiety. In this episode I explore three different ways you can relieve anxiety by fleeing into a purpose.


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Putting E85 in a Gas-Only Car

We recently tried it in our car and succeeded. This is what happened:

We'd read the letter by John Kolak on using E85 in regular cars, and then we read Marc Rauch's response. Rauch describes his ongoing experiments with E85 in non-flex-fuel vehicles, and it was all positive. And we also read about Robert Zubrin's experiments with methanol and his discovery that non-flex fuel cars already have the components to be flex fuel cars.

But we were still skeptical and didn't want anything bad to happen to our beloved 2001 Prius, so we bought a conversion kit and installed it.

In order to fix an unrelated problem with our car, we took off the conversion kit (temporarily, we thought) but in the process, we broke one of the conversion kit's plugs. So we decided to gather up some courage and try E85 without a kit just to see what would happen. We were watching David Blume's video where he says he once mentioned on a national talk show that anyone could put E85 in their regular car, and immediately the petroleum industry made it mandatory for all gas stations to put stickers on their E85 pumps warning people not to put E85 into non-flex-fuel cars. Watch Blume's video here. Blume's reassurance that you can put E85 into any car (and that it's perfectly legal) was the final straw for us.

We decided to do it. We thought we'd try it in stages. So first we waited until our tank was pretty empty and put in one gallon of E85. By our calculations, that meant we were running on 33% alcohol. We figured if there was a problem, we had plenty of room in the tank to fill up with regular gasoline and dilute the ethanol enough to stop whatever problem it was causing. But we didn't have any problems. We couldn't even tell the difference. Our 2001 Prius was successfully burning E33! This was encouraging.

The next phase of our experiment was to let the tank empty out some more. Then we put in three gallons of E85. By our calculations that made it E70 (70% ethanol in the tank). We still had enough room to add four more gallons of regular gasoline if there was a problem, which would have brought it back down to about E30, and we already knew the car could handle that.

But again, there was no problem. We couldn't tell any difference. The car was running perfectly! We drove around quite a bit, using up most of the tank. Everything was going smoothly.

This was great. Then we embarked on a 500-mile trip and on our way out of town, we filled up with E85, which put us at probably E80 or so. While we were at the station, we looked carefully at the little warning sticker. It said we should check with the clerk before putting E85 in our car. So we went in to see what the clerk would say. He said the warning was on there because E85 can damage engines. "Where did you hear that?" we asked. "The tow truck guy told me," he said, "apparently it burns too hot or something."

We straightened him out. Alcohol burns cooler than gasoline.

Anyway, with our tank full of E85, we drove up over the Cascade Mountains (in Washington State). No problems. The only thing that seemed different is that the car had a little more power than we were used to. This is not surprising. They use ethanol in the Indianapolis 500 because it is safer but also because it can give a car more horsepower (it's a higher-octane fuel).

Other than that, we couldn't tell any difference. So our non-flex-fuel Prius went up a long grade to a high elevation burning E80 with no problems. This was incredible. We were so happy. John Kolak and Marc Rauch and David Blume were right!

After about 90 miles, we stopped at a rest area and when we got back on the road, the engine light came on.

Uh oh.

But we already knew this was a possibility. Rauch said he has put straight E85 into many cars and in some of them, the engine light came on. Our car kept running fine. There wasn't really a problem. But the O2 sensor was detecting fewer emissions than expected, and the car's computer thought something must be wrong.

Rauch said he took his car into a shop and had them check why the engine light was on (without telling them he was burning E85). They told him his O2 sensor was broken. He said thanks, drove away, filled up on straight gasoline and after awhile, the engine light went off. He took the car to the shop again, told them the engine light was coming on intermittently and had them check it out. Nothing was wrong now. The sensor had healed! Not really. It was never broken in the first place.

So we decided on our trip to drive the Prius for awhile with the engine light on. The car ran perfectly. When it was time to fill up, we put in one gallon of regular gasoline to see if that would make the light go off. Apparently that wasn't enough. So we filled up on regular gasoline. Still the light stayed on. We thought we were going to have to take it to the shop to get it reset or something.

But before we headed for home, the light went off and has been off since!

Now we think we'll just burn E85 all the time and let the engine light shine like a badge of courage. We took a risk and discovered we can immediately stop sending our fuel dollars to OPEC and we can give it instead to American farmers and American workers where it can do some good for our economy and our air quality (ethanol produces fewer emissions that cause health problems).

Maybe once in awhile when we get nervous about it, we will fill the tank with gasoline just to see the engine light go off again. But then again, maybe not. It feels too good to fill our tank with freedom.

Adam Khan is the co-author with Klassy Evans of Fill Your Tank With Freedom and the author of Slotralogy and Self-Reliance, Translated. Follow his podcast, The Adam Bomb.

Why Evolution Created Republicans and Democrats — Season 4, Episode 4 of the Adam Bomb Podcast


Click on a link below to listen on your favorite podcast platform:

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Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1481990586/the-adam-bomb

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-adam-bomb/support

Adam is the author of the following books: 

How to Change the Way You Look at Things (in Plain English): https://amzn.to/3gdiQ33 
Antivirus For Your Mind: https://amzn.to/36nq9ka 
Principles For Personal Growth: https://amzn.to/3bRidbR 
Cultivating Fire: https://amzn.to/2WTiiYs 
Direct Your Mind: https://amzn.to/3gePh16 
Self-Help Stuff That Works: https://amzn.to/3bUwMvB 
Slotralogy: https://amzn.to/2zj8DBm 
Fill Your Tank With Freedom: https://amzn.to/2LPtnU7 
Self-Reliance, Translated: https://amzn.to/2TqW25V 
What Difference Does It Make: https://amzn.to/2LPWPt8 

Follow Adam Li Khan here: https://www.adamlikhan.com/

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Direct Your Mind: What Abilities Do I Have? What Am I Good At?

The best way to direct your mind is with a good question. Ask yourself a question and ask it again and again. Make up your own question or use one of the questions here. And one very good question to ponder is, “What am I good at?”

Recalling your own abilities helps nurture and strengthen those abilities (making you more capable of getting things done) and it also makes you feel better about yourself to remember what you’re good at. Try it right now and you’ll feel noticeably better almost immediately. Technically, you may “already know” your strengths. But if you took five minutes and thought up four of your greatest strengths right now, you would feel noticeably better. You’d feel stronger and more capable, and those are useful feelings to experience.

You have strengths you take for granted. But if you suddenly didn’t have one of your strengths, you would sorely miss it. Recognize that simple fact, and appreciate what you have by asking this question: What abilities do I have? Ponder it. Write down your answers. Make a list, and as you think of more, keep adding to the list.

If you think about this in your head, your thoughts will tend to drift toward your weaknesses and the mistakes you’ve made because of your brain’s automatic negative bias (read more about that in the book, Antivirus for the Mind). To help you focus on the question, use paper and pen and set a target: Either set a timer or aim for coming up with a definite number of answers.

In other words, set a timer for say, twenty minutes, and keep coming up with answers until the timer goes off. Or write at the top of a piece of paper: Ten things I’m good at. Then don’t stop until you write down ten. Forcing yourself in this way squeezes out good answers you might not otherwise come up with.

Do this exercise and you will feel better. That kind of positive emotion is good for your health. Not only will it make you feel better, but it helps you realize what you are especially good at, and it will encourage you to do more of it.

Brian Tracy, Alan Laiken and many other experts on accomplishment have pointed out that if you are not very good at accounting but you’re great at selling, you’ll make more money and have more fun in the long run if you spend the money to pay an accountant so you can spend more time selling. Find out what your abilities are and you’ll find it easier to focus on what you’re good at.

It may not be a good idea to brag to others about your special qualities, but it is very good for you to acknowledge your abilities to yourself. False internal humility in the privacy of your own mind is really a form of lying to yourself, and self-deception of this kind is not good for you.

Ask yourself the questions, “What abilities do I have?” and “What am I good at?” Becoming more aware of your abilities makes you saner, healthier, and stronger. You’ll feel better and get more done.

You can find out your “signature strengths” by taking the VIA Signature Strengths Questionnaire. A signature strength is a character trait or virtue that you habitually display and enjoy expressing.

Adam Khan is the author of Principles For Personal Growth, Slotralogy, Antivirus For Your Mind, and co-author with Klassy Evans of How to Change the Way You Look at Things (in Plain English). Follow his podcast, The Adam Bomb.

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The Pleasures of Partisanship







The above is quoted from an article entitled, Partisan Division, The Founders, and Moral Philosophy.

Feel free to post or distribute the memes above to help us all rise out of our partisan feelings for a moment and just be human.

Your Built-in Antidote for Anxiety and Stress - Season 1, Episode 13 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

We all know about the fight-or-flight response, but many of us are not aware of the built-in, natural recovery response, or how to activate it. But you are about to find out.

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The Righteous Mind: Why We Are Politically Divided - Season 1, Episode 14 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

Why can't liberals and conservatives get along? Has something changed? Can something be done about it? Jonathan Haidt's book, "The Righteous Mind," provides the best answers I think we'll find. I discuss the book in this podcast.

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How to Enjoy Talking Politics - Season 1, Episode 15 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

When you're talking to someone who is of a different political persuasion than you are, it can sometimes be uncomfortable and unpleasant, but it doesn't have to be. I explain on this podcast how you can make those conversations fun and enjoyable, and also how to become less upset by social media posts and comments from the other side of the aisle.

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The Ultimate Answer to Boredom - Season 1, Episode 16 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

The answer to boredom was found by a psychiatrist locked away in concentration camps during World War II. He left behind his wisdom for all of us. Curing boredom turns out to be something profound.

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Are Conspiracy Theories Dangerous or Necessary? Are They Important? - Season 1, Episode 17 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

Why are conspiracy theories so common? What do people get out of them? In this podcast, I explore some of the research about conspiracy theories and the people who believe in them.

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Adam Khan and Ben Wagner Talk About Conspiracy Theories - Season 1, Episode 18 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

A father and son discuss their differences of opinion about conspiracy theories. Are conspiracy theories important? Are they ridiculous? Can they be simply dismissed? Do their presence have an influence on a functioning democracy?

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What is a Legitimate News Source? - Season 1, Episode 19 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

Adam Li Khan and Ben Wagner discuss whether or not conspiracy theories can be considered a legitimate news source, and questions about mainstream news sources and their reliability. This is an excerpt from a longer podcast.

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Covid-19 Conspiracy Theories - Season 1, Episode 20 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

This is an excerpt from a longer podcast, recorded 12 April 2020. In this segment, we talked about theories about the pharmaceutical industry, and whether Bill Gates' commitment to vaccinations is suspicious or just practical.

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Zeitgeist's Criticism of Our Monetary System - Season 1, Episode 21 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

This is an excerpt from a longer podcast, originally published 12 April 2020. Ben Wagner and Adam Li Khan talk about the movie, Zeitgeist, and its view of the current financial system of the world, and its sustainability.

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Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them - Season 1, Episode 22 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

This is a summary of what I thought were the best parts of the book, Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them, plus a few extra comments from me. The book is a collection of chapters written by 31 different authors, all of whom are experts on conspiracy theories, but in different fields, including political scientists, psychologists, sociologists, and historians. Although most of the chapters are written like scientific papers (academic language and lots of citations), the book is fascinating.

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Is It Possible to Cure Someone of Conspiracy Thinking? - Season 1, Episode 23 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

This is basically about a scientific paper on how to correct misinformation, written by five researchers. The scientists look at the studies available on what is actually effective when correcting misinformation, and how to prevent the backfire effect (when your efforts to change someone's mind makes them even more firmly convinced they were right to begin with).

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The Differences Between the Sexes Have Real Consequences — Season 4, Episode 3 of the Adam Bomb Podcast


Click on a link below to listen on your favorite podcast platform:

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7MZumBdru2gbm2HiGRgtHe
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxSH7k2tyfK7wSmkg91pE2PZ7iLwl2wV9
Apple Podcasts: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/apple-podcasts/id525463029
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Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/the-adam-bomb
Anchor: https://anchor.fm/the-adam-bomb
Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1481990586/the-adam-bomb

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-adam-bomb/support

Adam is the author of the following books: 

How to Change the Way You Look at Things (in Plain English): https://amzn.to/3gdiQ33 
Antivirus For Your Mind: https://amzn.to/36nq9ka 
Principles For Personal Growth: https://amzn.to/3bRidbR 
Cultivating Fire: https://amzn.to/2WTiiYs 
Direct Your Mind: https://amzn.to/3gePh16 
Self-Help Stuff That Works: https://amzn.to/3bUwMvB 
Slotralogy: https://amzn.to/2zj8DBm 
Fill Your Tank With Freedom: https://amzn.to/2LPtnU7 
Self-Reliance, Translated: https://amzn.to/2TqW25V 
What Difference Does It Make: https://amzn.to/2LPWPt8 

Follow Adam Li Khan here: https://www.adamlikhan.com/

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Direct Your Mind: What Is One Healthy Thing I Could Do Today To Feel Better?

You have control over your mood to a degree you might find surprising. Anything from taking a nap to having a snack to writing down what you’re grateful for can make you feel better in a very short time.

Some people are hesitant to improve their mood. People have told me before, “that’s just the way I feel right now,” and imply that if they were to try to change their mood it would be dishonest. Hogwash. They clearly haven’t thought that one through. Your mood changes like the weather. You are not your moods any more than you are the water that moves through your body.

It would be similar to saying, “My body just stinks. That’s the way I smell right now,” and that is your reason for not showering. As if showering would be dishonest. It’s just stupid. If you don’t want to put out any effort to feel better just because it feels better, then think about doing it for your better health. Or do it because it will improve the moods of those around you. Or because it makes you more effective in dealing with people. Or because it will improve your ability to solve problems. There are many good reasons to improve your mood and no good reason to continue in a bad mood when you can easily change it.

One man told me it bothered him that when he was at work and he was in a bad mood, his co-workers didn’t like it. “I feel like I’m obligated to pretend to feel good when I don’t.”

“What makes you think you’re obligated,” I asked.

“I don’t know,” he sighed, “they try to cheer me up, or they give me a bad time about being grumpy, or they get short-tempered with me like they’re mad at me for not feeling good.”

“That’s interesting,” I said. “I remember reading a study on charisma. They had three people in a room just sit there. One of them was naturally charismatic, and the other two were not. They were told to just sit there and not say anything for a little while. At the end of that short time, without saying a word, the moods of the two less-charismatic people had moved toward the mood of the charismatic person.”

He looked puzzled.

“In other words,” I explained, “They tested the moods of all three before and after sitting in the room together. Let’s say the charismatic person was feeling irritable beforehand. Maybe one of the other people was feeling cheerful. After sitting in the room, the cheerful (but uncharismatic) person was more irritable.

“All I’m saying is that moods are contagious, and that is especially so when someone is charismatic, like yourself. So probably when you’re in a bad mood, it starts ruining the moods of the people around you and they are resisting that.”

“What, so I’m responsible for their moods now?” He didn’t seem too happy about this.

“There is some good and bad to just about anything. When you’re charismatic, it’s great because you make friends easily, people are attracted to you, you’re more persuasive, you have more influence on others, and so on. On the other hand, people pay more attention to your moods and that may seem like a burden, but it is nothing more than being in a position of leadership. Charisma is a power. And like the uncle in Spiderman said, ‘With great power comes great responsibility.’”

He laughed but he got the point too. And I hope you do too.

Whatever the cause of your mood, it is almost always true that you can do something about it. If you feel stressed, you can meditate or do some aerobic exercise. If you feel like you have no energy you could have a cup of coffee or go for a walk or take a nap. If you feel angry, you could use the antivirus for the mind or write in a diary or talk to a friend. If you feel lonely, you could reach out and communicate with someone or read a good book on relationships.

Ask yourself how you can improve your mood at the moment, and keep asking until you come up with some good answers, and then pick one and do it.

When you want to improve your mood, simply ask the question: What’s one healthy thing I could do today to feel better? 

Adam Khan is the author of Principles For Personal Growth, Slotralogy, Antivirus For Your Mind, and co-author with Klassy Evans of How to Change the Way You Look at Things (in Plain English). Follow his podcast, The Adam Bomb.

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Finding Common Ground During Election Season

Presidential elections are coming up. If that means uncomfortable conversations, or strife between you and family members or people you work with, or even just frustration at how members of the "opposing party" could possibly be so stupid, I've been doing something I'd like to share with you that creates a feeling of common ground rather than division.

It comes from an article in Scientific American Mind on the differences between liberals and conservatives, mostly about research by Jonathan Haidt, the author of The Righteous Mind. It seems counterintuitive that delving into the differences between liberals and conservatives would bring people together, but that's exactly what happens.

Several times now, when I've gotten into conversations with people about politics and the conversation started feeling divisive, I brought up some of Haidt's findings, and it shifted the conversation because his discoveries point to an important fact: Conservatives and liberals have a lot of common ground, and often share values. The priority of those values may be different, but they often both recognize that those values are important.

For example, in one study, when they showed people collages of photographs, conservatives' eyes spent more time looking at the more disturbing or unpleasant images in the collage. Many studies have demonstrated, in one way or another, that conservatives are more alert to threats, but that doesn't mean liberals are necessarily cavalier about safety and security. They may differ on their thresholds — differ on how bad it has to be before they are alarmed enough to do something about it — but they still care about it.

Conservatives are more anxious than liberals, generally speaking. That's one of the reasons they resist change. They want things to stay stable because change can be scary, and sometimes things change for the worse, not the better. Again, this is a sliding scale, not a black-and-white (or should I say "blue-and-red") division. Liberals also feel anxiety, just not as strongly as conservatives. And the feeling of safety versus anxiety is not fixed in any given person. In the SciAmMind article, the author writes:

When people feel safe and secure, they become more liberal; when they feel threatened, they become more conservative. Research conducted by Nail and his colleague in the weeks after September 11, 2001, showed that people of all political persuasions became more conservative in the wake of the terrorist attacks.


Haidt's work suggests that we all share six basic, inborn moral values, which are then influenced by culture and experience. The six values are:

1. Care for others.
2. Fairness and justice.
3. Liberty and freedom from oppression.
4. Loyalty and freedom from betrayal.
5. Respect for legitimate authority.
6. Aversion to harmful, disgusting things, foods, or actions.

Liberals tend to care more about some of these and less about others. Conservatives are just the opposite. What I think you'll find when you look at the studies is that the point of view of both right and left are necessary, rather than one being right and one being wrong, and that is an insight that can help bring us together.

So that's my recommendation for improving your mood during election season. When the conversation starts to feel divisive — even if you're talking to someone you agree with, but it starts feeling like "us versus them" — bring up some of this research. Just say something like, "I was reading an interesting article," and share some of the research findings. I think you'll find it improves your mood and the person's mood you're talking to. Maybe we can build more bridges between us this way.

Read the Scientific American Mind article here: Unconscious Reactions Separate Liberals and Conservatives.

Explore your own morals here: Test Your Morals.

Watch a TEDtalk with Jonathan Haidt: The Moral Roots of Liberals and Conservatives.

And here's another video, this one of Bill Moyers talking with Haidt: How Do Conservatives and Liberals See the World?

Adam Khan is the author of Principles For Personal Growth, Slotralogy, Antivirus For Your Mind, and co-author with Klassy Evans of How to Change the Way You Look at Things (in Plain English). Follow his podcast, The Adam Bomb.

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Masculinity Has Been Neutered — Here's How it Happened - Season 4, Episode 2 of the Adam Bomb Podcast


Read an article about this here. Click on a link below to listen on your favorite podcast platform:

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7MZumBdru2gbm2HiGRgtHe
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxSH7k2tyfK7wSmkg91pE2PZ7iLwl2wV9
Apple Podcasts: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/apple-podcasts/id525463029
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Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/the-adam-bomb
Anchor: https://anchor.fm/the-adam-bomb
Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1481990586/the-adam-bomb

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-adam-bomb/support

Adam is the author of the following books: 

How to Change the Way You Look at Things (in Plain English): https://amzn.to/3gdiQ33 
Antivirus For Your Mind: https://amzn.to/36nq9ka 
Principles For Personal Growth: https://amzn.to/3bRidbR 
Cultivating Fire: https://amzn.to/2WTiiYs 
Direct Your Mind: https://amzn.to/3gePh16 
Self-Help Stuff That Works: https://amzn.to/3bUwMvB 
Slotralogy: https://amzn.to/2zj8DBm 
Fill Your Tank With Freedom: https://amzn.to/2LPtnU7 
Self-Reliance, Translated: https://amzn.to/2TqW25V 
What Difference Does It Make: https://amzn.to/2LPWPt8 

Follow Adam Li Khan here: https://www.adamlikhan.com/

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Somebody Has to Be First

We watched "42" today — the movie about Jackie Robinson, the first African American baseball player in the major leagues. It was a great movie. The reason Robinson is remembered with so much respect today is not just because he was an extraordinarily talented ball player, and not just because he was first, but because he took all the hostility and discrimination the world could throw at him and he didn't fight back with hostility or discrimination. He fought back by being gracious and gentlemanly in the face of intense racism (and by being an outstanding athlete).

I see great posts on the Fuel Freedom Facebook page, but often they get hostile responses. The same thing happens on the Open Fuel Standard web site and Facebook page. The hostility is mild compared to what Robinson had to endure, but it still it sometimes discourages me. I somehow keep foolishly expecting it to be easy. I keep expecting people to instantly recognize the beauty and practicality of fuel competition and rally to the cause. But it doesn't usually happen that way.

When you talk to people about fuel competition, what do you get back? I'll bet sometimes you get hostility. People will tell you that ethanol will cause food shortages, methanol is poisonous, or that we need to solve the oil monopoly by drilling even more oil, and so on. And many more people have this point of view than those who understand the foolishness of maintaining a monopoly for the most vital commodity on earth (transportation fuel).

The Australian oil man, John Masters, said, "You have to recognize that every 'out front' maneuver is going to be lonely. But if you feel entirely comfortable, then you’re not far enough ahead to do any good. That warm sense of everything going well is usually the body temperature at the center of the herd."

When you run up against resistance, when it seems everyone is ignorant and you feel alone in your understanding about the promise and potential of breaking oil's monopoly in America, please recognize that you are simply out front — far enough ahead to do some good — and press on.

Many people were against African Americans playing in the major leagues. But now that seems backward and pathetic. Many people (and powerful monied interests) were against women getting the vote in America. But now that also seems backward and pathetic. And some day people will remember back when almost all our cars were built to run on only one fuel and it will also seem backward and pathetic. People will look back and wonder what we were thinking. Why would we ever do something so self-defeating?

Let us commit ourselves to making that great day come as soon as possible. 

Adam Khan is the co-author with Klassy Evans of Fill Your Tank With Freedom and the author of Slotralogy and Self-Reliance, Translated. Follow his podcast, The Adam Bomb.

Oil's Monopoly of Transportation Fuel Promotes Terrorism

Saudi oil money was used to fund the Boston mosque the two Boston bombers attended, according to this article in USA Today. It cost more than 15 million dollars to found the mosque. Over half of it came from Saudi sources, which gives them influence over what agenda is promoted in the mosque.

Saudi Wahhabis have used their oil money, which they are illegally obtaining by price-fixing, to fund over 90 percent of all Islamic institutions worldwide, promoting their fundamentalist, intolerant, and violent agenda around the world, including mosques all over the U.S.

The high price of oil is a direct result of Saudi Arabia's influence on OPEC, which is exploiting the fact that the United States is a one-fuel economy, which is held in place by automakers, who have so far been reluctant to make their cars capable of allowing fuel competition, something they could do easily and inexpensively.

The Open Fuel Standard would change that, and change the world.

How Oil Prices Influence Employment

There is an insidious side effect of rising gasoline prices. As people spend more money on gas, they spend less money on other things, and that causes the loss of jobs.

“Since consumer spending is the main driver of the U.S. economy,” says Mark Cooper, Research Director of the Consumer Federation of America, “when speculators, oil companies and OPEC rob consumers of that much spending power, the inevitable result is a dramatic reduction of economic activity and employment.”

In Cooper’s study of the effect of oil prices on jobs, he discovered that every time oil prices have spiked since World War II, we’ve had a recession in America. In his study, he showed that because oil was about $30 a barrel higher than “costs or historic trends justify,” gas prices rose by a dollar a gallon in one year (from the summer of 2010 to the summer of 2011), which drained about 200 billion dollars from the economy. This is about two percent of consumer spending. That doesn’t seem like much, but two percent less spending (200 billion dollars) created the loss of hundreds of thousands of jobs.

Another way to look at it is that because most of our cars are not warranted to burn anything but gasoline, we imported about $500 billion dollars per year of oil, sending that money out of the country. That would have paid five million workers $100,000 a year! But the money leaving our country just leaves — doing nothing for us. If the same money was paid to workers here, it would have a huge ripple effect in our economy because that money would then be used to buy other goods and services in America.

- Excerpted from the book, Fill Your Tank With Freedom.

The Game Changers Documentary Has Some Important Flaws - Season 1, Episode 24 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

This is a conversation between Adam Li Khan and Ben Wagner talking about the documentary, The Game Changers, a very well-made movie that tries to convince the viewer that a vegetarian diet is far superior than eating meat. But some of what they said in the movie was misleading.

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The Global War of Data: The New Central Commodity - Season 1, Episode 25 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

This is a conversation between Adam Li Khan and Ben Wagner, discussing how data is replacing oil as the key commodity in the world.

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Why is the Coronavirus Crisis so Confusing? - Season 1, Episode 26 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

It is frustrating how little we still know about this virus. Why? How is it possible that in this modern age we can't seem to figure it out? Adam Li Khan and Ben Wagner discuss it in this episode.

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5G Conspiracy Theories in the Age of Misinformation - Season 1, Episode 27

The number of 5G conspiracy theories has grown rapidly recently, partly being driven by foreign governments trying to slow down our deployment of the technology, but do we really know if 5G networks really harm human beings? In this episode Ben Wagner and Adam Li Khan discuss the issue.

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What's So Great About Fasting? - Season 1, Episode 28 of the Adam Bomb Podcast

In this episode, Adam discusses some of the benefits of going without food, and talks about some of the interesting studies that have been done on it. He also mentions a few things he's learned about doing it himself that might help make your fasts easier.

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One Simple Way to Improve Your Marriage - Season 1, Episode 29

This is a description of an experiment showing how one simple change can improve how satisfied your spouse is in your marriage, and how committed your spouse is.

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Breathing Through Your Mouth While You Sleep Could Make You Less Healthy and Less Intelligent - Season 4, Episode 1 of the Adam Bomb Podcast


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How to Change the Way You Look at Things (in Plain English): https://amzn.to/3gdiQ33 
Antivirus For Your Mind: https://amzn.to/36nq9ka 
Principles For Personal Growth: https://amzn.to/3bRidbR 
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Direct Your Mind: https://amzn.to/3gePh16 
Self-Help Stuff That Works: https://amzn.to/3bUwMvB 
Slotralogy: https://amzn.to/2zj8DBm 
Fill Your Tank With Freedom: https://amzn.to/2LPtnU7 
Self-Reliance, Translated: https://amzn.to/2TqW25V 
What Difference Does It Make: https://amzn.to/2LPWPt8 

Follow Adam Li Khan here: https://www.adamlikhan.com/

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Masculinity Has Been Neutered — Here's How It Happened

A lot has changed in the last 200 years, and a lot of it has been great. But some trends have had negative consequences.

Robert Glover has a PhD in family and marriage therapy, and he's been a therapist for a long time. Over twenty years ago, he started noticing a consistent pattern in many of his male clients that he eventually named "The Nice Guy Syndrome." It is a combination of thoughts and behaviors that distance these men from their own masculine nature.

He noticed it because he himself was a Nice Guy. He has been helping men recover from Nice Guy Syndrome for a long time now, and working to make others aware of the problem.

The reason it's a problem is that Nice Guy Syndrome prevents men from living up to their full potential, it makes their relationships with women difficult, it ruins their sex life, and it produces a lot of frustration. 

How did this syndrome come about? Because society has changed in several important ways. The following are some of the changes that led to men becoming disconnected from their natural masculinity:

1. Only a century or two ago, most boys grew up on a farm. So a boy was around men a lot — not just his father, but also his grandfathers, his uncles, and his older brothers and older male cousins. That changed with the industrial revolution. Men went off to work. Boys were left in the care of their mothers.

2. Along the same lines, people moved from farms to cities, which caused boys to have less contact with adult males. The reason this is important is because as a boy grows up, he is developing psychologically and emotionally with a male brain (developed in the womb) and male hormones (read more about that here), and he's supposed to learn how to deal with those by being under the influence of older men. That's how men learn to be men. That long lineage of wisdom passed down through the generations for hundreds of thousands of years has now been largely cut off by these social changes, leaving boys to be taught how to be men by women, people who don't have those hormones or that brain structure. It disconnects those boys for the rest of their life from their innate masculine nature.

3. Another big change has been a lot more divorce, leading to more boys being raised by a single parent, usually the mother. As the boy develops, masculinity is being defined by a woman.

4. Grade school is dominated by female teachers. Boys are being taught to get approval from women, and typical masculine behavior in boys doesn't usually get a lot of approval from female teachers. Boys learn their masculine impulses are wrong.

5. The women's liberation movement also became hostile to many aspects of masculine behavior, stigmatizing masculine behavior, and influencing boys to distance themselves further from their masculine nature.

6. Another factor that Robert Glover identifies as influential was the Vietnam war. Young men distanced themselves from older men by rejecting the "establishment." A serious riff opened up between men who had proudly fought in World War II and their sons who tried to get out of fighting in Vietnam. Their fathers couldn't believe it, and rejected their sons. And their sons grew up rejecting everything their fathers represented, and raised their own sons accordingly.

7. In many of the single parent households run by a mother, the mom made the dad wrong and tried to make sure their sons didn't grow up to be like him.

I would add to Glover's list that people move away more now than they used to. People are far more mobile than they were only fifty years ago, so if your parents moved you away from your hometown when you were young, they prevented you from having the influence of your male uncles, cousins, and grandfathers. It happens to a lot of people. It happened to me, and, in fact, it is still happening. I live in Seattle, for example. My uncles live in Northern California, Southern California, and Nevada. One of my male cousins lives in Southern California, not in the same city as my uncle. My other male cousin lives in Montana. My father lived in Arizona while he was alive. My brother lives in Europe most of the time. (He actually lives everywhere. He wrote a book about it. Check it out. It's called Gastronomad.)

My nephews live in Northern California and Las Vegas. My son lives in Thailand. All of the males in my family are separated from each other. Our influence on each other is therefore limited. 

This kind of mobility has been happening for decades. Whatever natural comfort and familiarity boys might have gotten about their own masculinity from hanging out with older males never happened because those older males were not there. Instead, maleness has been influenced and defined by mothers and female teachers.

Another factor Glover doesn't mention, but I think is worth noting, is fewer offspring. People are having fewer children than they used to, so there are fewer older male cousins, and fewer or no older brothers, and fewer uncles.

The result of all this disconnect between boys and masculinity is that those boys grow up to be Nice Guys who repress their own natural masculinity — their inborn ways of being, thinking, feeling, behaving, because they have the impression it isn't good.

Masculinity has been neutered. Castrated. It wasn't a surgical castration or a chemical castration, it was a cultural castration. Castration by indoctrination.

The result is men who don't know how to be men, who suspect and deny their own masculine proclivities, and it really interferes with the natural order of things in a relationship between those men and their female significant others.

Have you ever seen the movie Bedazzled? In one scene, Brandon Frazier plays a man who is an extreme SNAG (Sensitive New Age Guy). He's sweet, kind, caring, thoughtful, emotionally vulnerable, etc. He is exactly the kind of person that a doting mother would want her sweet little boy to be. And it is driving his girlfriend absolutely crazy. She's somewhat conflicted because he is what she was hoping a man could be, but now that she's actually dealing with it, it's driving her crazy. She cannot be attracted to him. It is unnatural.

Finally, in a fit of frustration, she bursts out with the honest truth: "I just want to be with a man who will ignore me and take me for granted, and who is only pretending to be interested in who I am and what I think so he can get into my pants..." Sometimes something is funny because it's a truth nobody wants to say out loud.

What can be done about this? If you think you have Nice Guy Syndrome, you are certainly not alone. You can recover from it, and it's well worth the trouble. Overcoming it will make you more relaxed, at ease, comfortable in your own skin, happy in your relationship and with your sex life, and fulfilling your potential.

The first thing to do is read Robert Glover's book, No More Mr. Nice Guy. He has several suggestions to help you recover from the syndrome. One of his recommendations, for example, is to hang out with men more often — especially men who grew up with fathers, uncles, and grandfathers around. They have absorbed what used to be absorbed in every generation.

One of the more interesting suggestions Glover offers is to stop doing favors for your woman. Nice Guys are driven to gain approval from the women they love. This is what they were trained to do. And the effort to stop doing things for your woman makes it painfully clear that this is a compulsion of yours. Overcoming that compulsion will go a long way toward helping you recover.

Another one of his suggestions is to stop being low maintenance. Nice Guys have learned (from the females who raised them) to be low maintenance, to be easy, to have very low needs. This pattern needs to end, so one of the practices he suggests is to do things to take care of yourself and to express your needs — to stop being so low maintenance.

If your masculinity has been neutered, it was done by indoctrination, and can be undone by you. You'll be happier if you do.

Listen to this as a podcast here.

Adam Khan is the author of What Difference Does It Make?: How the Sexes Differ and What You Can Do About It, Principles For Personal Growth, Direct Your Mind, and co-author with Klassy Evans of How to Change the Way You Look at Things (in Plain English). Follow his podcast, The Adam Bomb.